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Bloom to Demise

A powerful and moving exploration of life, history, and women power through the lens of Wang Yiya's own unique perspective.

Limited Edition Prints

Insel Island Gallery has partnered with Wang Yiya in creating a limited edition print based on her original paintings in "Blossom to Demise" worldwide. 

This series is a collection of work that explores the natural cycle of life, from the beginning stages of growth to the eventual decay. The below prints are exclusively sold by Insel Island Gallery and will never be reprinted.

Giclee prints on silk from Wang Yiya's studio in China. Signed by Wang Yiya with an auth-card.

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The series "Bloom to Demise" by Yiya is a collection of work that explores the natural cycle of life, from the beginning stages of growth to the eventual decline and decay. The use of contrasting paint on the flourishing crown and the void face allows us to feel the change immediately.

Ning Zong Empress Crown

The intricate details in Yiya's paintings are done on specially made silk canvases from Hangzhou. The white pigment creates a beautiful backdrop that tells the story of ancient life. These paintings are not only beautiful, but also fun to read.
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Qin Zong Empress Crown

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Yiya's favorite art period is the Song Dynasty because it is the peak period of Chinese history for painting, art, and aesthetics.

Song Dynasty art is characterized by its graceful simplicity and serene beauty. The art of this period is often associated with the zen Buddhism, which was popular during that time. The art of the Song Dynasty reflects the peaceful and harmonious nature of Chinese society during this time period.

Most of  Yiya's works are in this style. Her crowns in the "Bloom to Demise" collection are also inspired by the actual ancient paintings of empresses from the Song Dynasty.
In thousands of years passed, women are mostly overlooked, lost, like the void faces under the crowns.  Many women, great or ordinary, worked hard to thrive and blossom, only to be left out of the history written by men and of men. To see her work, is to see people, to see history, to see oneself, and what lies beyond.